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Wood work in progress

walks_in2_trees's picture

Making 3 of these for my mother's windows
my initial design is window treatment

I carved the stamens out after I took the photo and never thought to take another.

mara06's picture

Wow, that's beautiful! This

Wow, that's beautiful! This is for interior use, in lieu of the usual framing? I'd love to see the finished work in situ.

That's oak, isn't it? Hard to carve, I should think....

Mara

walks_in2_trees's picture

thank you

I will post some shots of the finished work, I have a little ways to go yet, but there is finally enough of it done now that I can show people and have it look like something :)

It's mahogany, not oak. As long as the tools are sharp, hardwood is actually easier to carve than softwoods like pine

this window trim piece goes beneath the window sill, haven't decided the top yet but the sills and the sides are already finished and in place. none of them are quite this refined though.

"...and mamma cried: Watch out where the huskies go, don't you eat that yellow snow" - Frank Zappa

mara06's picture

My gosh, how pretty that's

My gosh, how pretty that's going to be (already is, but you know what I mean). I don't believe I've ever seen that kind of window treatment before; sounds like something from a fairy-tale :-) I didn't realize hard woods were easier to work with than the soft, but of course it makes sense, doesn't it? I also didn't realize mahogany had such a fine grain. I've only seen it, I guess, in that heavy, ornate Victorian furniture that's been so over-finished the real wood doesn't show through.

Mara

walks_in2_trees's picture

Mahogany

Mahogany is very beautiful wood. it has an "open grain" though which is probably why they used a heavy finish in the old days. You can see the open grain in the "original" copy o the photo. those dark lines aren't the color of the grain, they're actually tiny airspaces. A cabinet maker I met who builds cabinetry for yahts gave me a tip I'm going to try: I'm to fill the grain with super-fine pumice before using a polyeurethane or some such, so that after finishing you can see deep into the grain and have a glass like finish.

I actually got these boards from my garage. The previous owner had hired some contractor who took her for a ride. I have no way to know what he charged her for it, but mahogany isn't exactly cheap wood. there's mahogany trim all over in the house, but it's only got a basic finish, there's no beveling on any of it, just square boards nailed up quick with planer blade marks not even sanded out.

He trimmed out the garage in mahogany too, as if it were cheap pine, and made shelving too, all mahogany. I figured it was being wasted as shelves in the garage and my mother's house needed some remodeling, so here I am.

"...and mamma cried: Watch out where the huskies go, don't you eat that yellow snow" - Frank Zappa

Bravo

This is excellent, you are very talented. I can't see you getting a whole lot of harsh criticism on this post. Maybe a few jealous pixel jockies, like myself, cursing you and wishing they could crank out something as beautiful as this. You've got a lucky mother.

jHouse's picture

I think this is fantastic.

I think this is fantastic. Well done mate.

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walks_in2_trees's picture

Thanks :)

it's actually very similar to using photoshop. I work in layers, and plan carefully the order in which I'm going to work. Sometimes I wish I had an "Undo" but I look at each mistake as a reason for new inspiration! ;)

The hard part is conveying the feeling of depth in the design with very little actual depth to work with. this board was 3/4" (~2cm) I'd guess I'm only 1/4" at the deepest cuts

"...and mamma cried: Watch out where the huskies go, don't you eat that yellow snow" - Frank Zappa

3dogmama's picture

Lucky mom.

Mahogany. I hit a bit of a snag with it many years ago while trying to refinish a beautiful antique record cabinet. It was enveloped in that thick black lacquer so popular for that day and age. I was going at it with both a heat gun and gel stripper, taking my time within the carved areas of the legs.

However, at the end of it all I was a little disappointed. I don't know if it was a combination of the lacquer and the basic wear and tear of the years, or my stripping methods, but the wood had become weak and quite porous, basically destroyed.

Too bad because mahogany is one of the most gorgeous woods out there. When I think mahogany I think old-world class.

I LOVE your scroll work and the detailing with the flower is priceless. Are you self-taught?

"Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible."
— Frank Zappa

walks_in2_trees's picture

pretty much

It's hard to say if I'm self-taught or not, I don't recall anyone showing me, and I remember the trial and error, but I also grew up around art, music, and woodworking, so it becomes difficult to say what is self-taught and what I learned from watching. I guess it's self-taught, because no one formally sat down with me and showed me how to do it. I inherited my stepfather's carving tools when he died, and so I didn't really work with them until then. By that time I had also been drawing since I was 12, and highlight, shadow, perspective and use of contrast were all things I understood well by the time he died, and so it was just a matter of translating those same ideas to the wood.

If you look at my design (the pdf) you can see how I had started planning my use of depth by shading different areas.

"...and mamma cried: Watch out where the huskies go, don't you eat that yellow snow" - Frank Zappa

walks_in2_trees's picture

pretty much

It's hard to say if I'm self-taught or not, I don't recall anyone showing me, and I remember the trial and error, but I also grew up around art, music, and woodworking, so it becomes difficult to say what is self-taught and what I learned from watching. I guess it's self-taught, because no one formally sat down with me and showed me how to do it. I inherited my stepfather's carving tools when he died, and so I didn't really work with them until then. By that time I had also been drawing since I was 12, and highlight, shadow, perspective and use of contrast were all things I understood well by the time he died, and so it was just a matter of translating those same ideas to the wood.

If you look at my design (the pdf) you can see how I had started planning my use of depth by shading different areas.

"...and mamma cried: Watch out where the huskies go, don't you eat that yellow snow" - Frank Zappa

pokie's picture

wow wow wow! You are very

wow wow wow! You are very talented! How will you make them all match though?

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