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onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I'm curious—how long does it take you to design a logo?

To be honest, I am really sick and tired of impatient clients continuously bugging me about when their logo will be completed.

For example, I have this one client right now who paid me a few days after we met, and a week later, I had the first set of samples for him to look at. He didn't like any of them—fine. So I told him that it will probably take me another week, maybe less, to get a whole new set of logo samples to him, mainly because I had to start all over, as he didn't like any of the designs that I sent him the first time. Well, we're looking at barely a week later and he is already sending me e-mails stating that he hasn't seen anything from me in "quite some time." Well, it hasn't even been a full week since I sent him the first round of samples.

Although this is rare for me, it's not new. I realize that not every client out there will just love my first round of samples, but they're typically a little more patient than this guy.

His past two designers that he hired basically screwed him over, so I can completely understand his impatience. However, I have done nothing but keep him up to date with anything and I respond to his e-mails almost immediately.

Is it me, or am I taking too long with this? His "requirements" are a bit challenging, which has made me work on this longer/harder.

I guess that's why I wanted to know how long it takes you guys. If it's something that's done quickly or a process.

I need some advice because he is driving me MAD!!!!!

P.S. Nato, if you attach the link to "What is a Logo" I am going to scream!!!! LOL

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

Commenting on this Forum topic is closed.

donovan1's picture
59 pencils

you may tell the client if he wants to use his logo for 20 years then he should wait 3 weeks.

jozefk's picture
249 pencils

you know people in Dubai can't wait even for one week. really, in this country people wants everything immediately :) and they don't understand that's really bad for them. yeah, they can get everything immediately but the quality of that kind of logo or whatever is really poor if you compare it with any other logo which has been made for lets say a month or more. people they just don't understand that here, and maybe they don't really care about it at all. they just want everything right now. strange country, really. and strange people as well :)

I think that's good that you are replying to his messages often. And I hope he will become more patient once he will understand you are not such kind of designer which will screw him over :)

openSUSE
Linux for open minds

ReidDesigns's picture
1283 pencils

I had a guy call me from another island. . .yes ANOTHER ISLAND in the chain and gave me some hullabaloo about 'single market economies' and 'free trade agreements' and how he heard that my island had the best designers and was hoping to do some work with us (freelancers here not my agency). So I gave him a few names. a few months later he calls back in a panic saying that he's got SO MUCH WORK that the freelancer I put him on to is too busy and if I wanted to just handle a 'small job' NOW I was naive, I had been told that this guy DOES PAY so I said ok what do u want?

I need a logo. and I NEED it TOMORROW!

So I bust my @$$ to get him a couple of designs that HE CLAIMED was 'just to show his client some possibilities so that he can have a better idea of what needs to be done." when in the morning of the day he was SUPPOSED to pay he emails me a message saying (condensed) "I HATE everything you've done, you didn't do what I asked, you suck!" LOL

I emailed back him a nice 'form letter' stating (condensed) "Thanks but don't call me I'll call you." I never heard from him again and

WAS NEVER PAID!

lol

Logos are the WORST type of job to do as a designer. . . WORST, they want something NOW NOW NOW, then take YEARS deliberating (sometimes) and then after TONS AND TONS of changes and revisions and "sh!t" they don't pay saying "you didn't give us what we asked so were going by someone else." Needless to say what they then do is put the design out for a COMPETITION to catch young naive designers to do what we spent MONTHS doing and using OUR designs as a yardstick they choose something cheap looking and lame. . . lol

That's LIFE!

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I have learned years ago while I was a student, to NEVER start the work until I receive either a 50% deposit up front, or payment in full. And I always present them with a contract.

Luckily, this guy just went ahead and paid me in full via PayPal (he's local, but still 30 minutes away and didn't bring cash or a check, so I told him I wouldn't start the job until I received some sort of payment). He went home and paid me via PP, which is fine by me.

I agree with you about doing logo work. I am so sick of designing logos I could puke!!!! Honestly. Whenever I'm working on a project such as business card design, brochures, posters, etc. the client basically backs off. But inevitably when I'm working on a logo, the client becomes a pain in my A@@. I hate it. I'm getting to the point that I don't ever want to do logo designs again. It's a frickin' nightmare.

I knew this guy would be high maintenance BECAUSE of his other two designers literally screwing him over. I reassured him over and over that I wouldn't do that and as a result, I not only have been in constant contact with him but I had his first round of samples to him within a week. Apparently, the second designer he hired, he paid him and after a month, never got anything, not even a response. Obviously, I am not doing that here.

He called my cell phone last night at 8:30, which is total crap. I didn't answer it as I treat these clients like regular office hours (9–5) otherwise, I wouldn't have a family life. He didn't leave me a VM. Then he e-mails me about 30 minutes later (which I expected since he didn't leave me a message) saying "he hadn't seen anything in quite a while." Are you kidding me? It's been a week. Ugh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

After his e-mail, I explained to him (in a nice way) that it was important to have a trustworthy client/designer relationship...blah, blah, blah.

If you guys are interested, I'm more than happy to post my e-mail up here as I am desperate for advice. I really don't know what to do at this point. I'm tempted to just give him his damn money back but since I have been unemployed since December, I truly can't afford to do that.

HELP!!!!!

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

ReidDesigns's picture
1283 pencils

Maybe now you're getting an inkling as to why the other designers "screwed him over"! Clients are like spoilt children. . . they want it THEIR way, so as one of my friends once told me: "I have my own children to take care of! I don't need, nor want, another!" LOL (Especially someone else's for that matter!) So the BEST peice of advice given to me:

"Do the design you want and put it away. . . then do the design the client wants and let him destroy it. . . safe in the knowledge that you did the DESIGN YOU want and its OUT of your system. Once you're over THAT hurdle, cash your cheque!" :)

BTW you accepted 100% payment. . . so if I were in HIS shoes I would want to see results ASAP! Its an investment on his side and he's got MONEY riding on it. . . try to see it from his view.

MY advice: Do what he wants and move on. :) Ignore the panic attacks and hyperventilation and you'll be fine. :)

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I am doing what HE wants. This design is NOT something I would do at all. I think it's hideous and his ideas are awful, but I am going with it because it's what he wants, not me.

The only reason it is taking me longer is because the first round of samples that I submitted to him (there were 4 samples on the page), he didn't like any of them. He was still dead set to have his ideas instead. Fine.

So now I have to start over, not tweaking or revising any of the other samples because he didn't like any of them, and create all new samples. I'm sorry, but that is time consuming. He chose to pay me 100%, I didn't require that. I told him I would only need half, not the payment in full.

I never gave him an end date—the only promise I gave him was that I would have the first set of samples to him within a week. I honored that.

He didn't like any of them, so I am in the process of working on the second set of samples, which should be finished today (exactly one week after the first set of samples were sent to him).

He's just being paranoid and driving me crazy as a result.

--

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

ReidDesigns's picture
1283 pencils

With an estimate you can now turn around and say: "Ok you'll get your changes BUT since we've gone back now a THIRD time this is going to cost you $X." You see? With an estimate you can say "it took me 24 hours to get to this point. You've paid me for 24 hours NOW its going into 36 hours. . . hmmmm that comes up to. . .$x" you see? (as outlined in the ORIGINAL agreement for changes)

You DID give him an estimate did you?

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

+1 here.

Remember to bill hourly rather than "per project". That keeps the client aware that what you are doing is "work" and not just "art". Can you imagine a lawyer charging per case? That's why they charge per hour. :)

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

because you're right, the fee per project is becoming a bit cumbersome and the client seems to think I'm sitting on my tush doing nothing.

At least with an hourly rate, they can SEE for themselves what I'm doing. Ugh!!!!

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

i don't necessarily agree with billing hourly instead of per project. especially with logos. part of what they're paying for isn't your time but your expertise.

most studios i've worked with bill by project and generally based on expected hourly rates and sometimes w/some additional fees/charges built in. and this includes X amount of concepts presented and X amount of revisions (generally 2-3). if you go above either of those amounts, you then get billed additional per hour. your contract also provides a scope of work, and if the client wants to go outside that scope of work, you increase the cost of the job accordingly.

thing is, if it takes you two hours to come up with that brilliant concept for a logo, you're essentially getting paid for two hours of work if you bill hourly. and the reality is that it's your experience that allows you to do that. and the company is benefiting greatly from your experience, in that case, while you benefit little. but if it takes you about the amount of time you budgeted, you're both ok.

thing is, if you come up with something brilliant for a logo in 2 hours or if you come up with something in 20 hours, it's still got the same value to the client. and with additional profit at stake, it's to your benefit to work efficiently.

not to say you should never do billing by the hour, but you often shortchange yourself when you do. it's much more difficult to work on fixed price, but there are risks and rewards to it. and the rewards can be very good if you are efficient in how you work.

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Billing hourly doesn't negate skill. In fact a studio would build in multiple designers skills and other fees in their initial bid. My position is to make an estimate based on hours for the project, but then start working and up the bill if required. Then you don't lock yourself into a losing situation.

A logo taking 2 hours is a bit of a "what if" situation. It hardly ever goes that way and if it does--so much the better! Move on to the next job.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

i used the extreme to make the point, i know 2 hrs isn't necessarily realistic.

and yes, i know they would build in multiple designers skills and fees in, i alluded to that. but billing by project is fairly industry standard and there are definite benefits to bidding that way, as long as you know what you're doing. i know of very few studios (whether it's one person or 50 people) that actually bid on work hourly.

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

You always use the "I know very few [insert group here] and [industry standard, blah blah]" to prove your points. You don't know every agency out there. Some might bill hourly. There's got to be at least one.

An agency I'm doing web work for at the moment is getting screwed on a deal because they did project billing. I can't really see how that benefits them? I don't think you'd say that their billing "by project" made economic sense in this case. This seems to happen to freelancers more often than not. What exactly are the benefits by bidding by project then? I haven't seen any yet that I can agree with. Any examples that aren't "extreme" and I might take note and change my position a little but as of now, not changing it.

There are agencies that bill hourly. Lawyers bill hourly. Almost any profession that gets respect bills hourly. That's my point.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

to be fair, i'm talking about design firms, not other industries. different industries have very different methodologies (generally) for things like billing and estimating and other processes. things we would consider unethical and/or bad for our industry (i.e., spec work) are considered standard practice in other industries (architecture, for example).

btw, i didn't say nobody billed hourly. i said "most i've worked with bill by project." and, as you quoted, "i know of few." that's not none. i'm speaking anecdotally here based on conversations i've had with designers that i work with and socialize with in DC. hourly billing is very uncommon among them, especially the more senior of them.

but since we won't agree here, i'll let it go and let's just say there is more than one opinion on the best way to structure your estimates and billing.

there's an interesting article on freelanceswitch.com about this exact subject.

http://freelanceswitch.com/money/trading-the-hourly-rate-for-task-based-pay-should-you-do-it/

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

You still haven't shown me why you think billing per project is better than hourly? We're not really debating, you're just choosing not to really defend your position. (throws hands up). Long live the skinny thread post!

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

PLEASE stop fighting. Everybody kiss & make up.

Kiss Kiss!!!!!!!

LOL

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

i'll be lazy and say read the thread on the link i posted. she said most of what i would have said (and a bunch more) better than i would. there's some good discussion in the comment section, too.

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Whatever. I'll just assume you don't disagree with me.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

and whatever, i'll just assume you don't want to know why it might be better. ;)

dpc's picture
357 pencils

Graphic, Web and Logo Designer from Pittsburgh, PA http://www.davidpcrawford.com

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Yep. THINNER!

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

That makes total sense. I think that's why I always felt comfortable quoting one fee for the whole project, but with 3 revisions.

Regardless, this guy is a putz!

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

In fact, I made it clear in both my contract and our verbal discussion that the fee he has paid me only includes 3 revisions. We're already on the first revision, as I don't count the first round of samples as a revision.

He knows.

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

You might try giving him milestones based on approvals. As you said, if he delays one milestone, it's no one's fault, but he has to remember that adds to the timeframe.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Remind the client about your process. Tell him a logo isn't just a design, it's a distillation of the image, communication and meaning of a company. Not easy terms to boil down into one symbol!

Second, if he's paid any less than $3000 for his logo he has no right to bitch at you. You aren't taking too long. You might consider, though, creating samples that take less time such as sketches. Maybe your initial meeting didn't connect his idea and your idea of what his logo should be? You might go back to that point and then you can move more swiftly to the conclusion of the job.

Third, remind the client of the Good/Fast/Cheap triangle and that he gets to pick two things on it. He's got Good and Cheap so he doesn't get to pick FAST. I think a week or two for research and comps is just barely enough. He should feel lucky that you are so communicative and upfront with your process. Whether he's been screwed or not is not your problem; we all get screwed in life!

And I know there's no need to quote the What is a Logo post to you, my dear. :) You've got it well in hand.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I have covered all of your bases, unfortunately. I have received MUCH less than $3,000 for this project, so even though he has paid significantly less, I understand that he is worried that I will screw him over. However, I have never screwed a client over, nor have I gone back on an agreement with one.

In fact, in my e-mail before this last one last night, I told him that I was working on my sketches and was about to execute them to the computer, which can take a day or two. In this case, two days. That's it.

So yes, I have discussed this process with him in length—95% of the time, I do preliminary sketches beforehand and THEN I execute them on the computer. I realize that nowadays, many designers no longer do this. As long as I've got the time, I can do this.

I even mentioned last night that had I known he was going to be a bit impatient for original work/sketches, I would have referred him to Kinko's where they create their logos using nothing but clipart and no imagination. Mine are all original designs/ideas, no clipart, just my own process and imagination. I guess he doesn't seem to get this.

Obviously, I was nice while saying this....barf!!!!

--

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Barf. He he. :)

Maybe you just need to show him sketches and save you both some time?

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I never thought of that. This way he can see for himself that I am not doing nothing, that I have a process that I typically stick with.

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

By the way, is the logo done yet? :)

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

I submitted the second set of samples (4) this morning, and he just got back to me about an hour ago saying that he "likes my ideas" but wants to meet in person to show me what he's wanting, however, he said he wants to incorporate some of my ideas from this round of samples to what he wants.

Confusing. Whatever. I guess we will meet whenever and see what he says/wants. He hasn't responded to that yet, so I guess we'll see when he's available.

Ugh!!!

I want this done already.

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Since he doesn't know what he wants he's going to print a bunch of crap off from the web and ask you to "do that".

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

That's what I'm afraid of. He's a nice guy (aside from being a total PITA), he doesn't have any taste. God, why did I accept this job........?????

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

ReidDesigns's picture
1283 pencils

M-O-N-E-Y

Put on AC/DC's "Moneytalks" now.

hehe

and btw: I go away fro a while and there are 22 new posts?! Man I couldn't read EVERYTHING! lol sorry!

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

Nah, it's just gwells arguing with me without having point or facts to back up said point.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

feel free to read the points in the article i linked to. if you choose not to, that's on you, not on me.

i guess i can copy/paste the whole article here with the comments, if it's really that difficult to click on the link. i figured if you actually cared to understand my point, you'd have clicked on it. if you prefer being argumentative w/o bothering to understand what i was saying, you'd ignore the link and continue to complain.

i know you have a bug in your butt about me disagreeing with you, but keep in mind that it takes two to argue and that when you point your finger at me, there are three pointing back at you. ;)

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

You argue like a 2 year old. You still haven't used your OWN WORDS to defend your position. I don't want to have you post an article here. That's just a waste of time. It's not the article disagreeing with me.

I'm done discussing it with you unless you can give me some of your own ideas beyond the "read this article" and "because I think it's true" arguments. I can get those on wikipedia any day of the week and it's not very interesting or meaningful.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

gwells's picture
1707 pencils

k

3dogmama's picture
1990 pencils

I, too, bill by the project and not hourly, and have a maximum of two sets of moderate alterations worked in to my quotes. Anything over that I let the client know that the price is going up. After all, time is money.

Most design firms and agencies charge by the project; and yes, I have worked with quite a few to KNOW that. I have never seen them quote an hourly wage on a project. They, like myself, guesstimate how many hours it's going to take and quote accordingly.

And in regards to the lawyer fee, I have no idea what my lawyers' hourly rates are. I always pay them a retainer and they let me know if I go over for their services. I have never asked what their hourly rate is nor have they ever quoted me in that respect. As long as they're within line of costs and put a smile on my face that's good enough for me.

It's to each their own how they wish to convey to their clients what they charge. If you like breaking it down with an hourly rate go for it. I just prefer to price per project and let the chips fall will they may. I know my hourly rate, I know approximately how long a project will take and quote accordingly. Sometimes I go over the time I have alloted for myself, sometimes I fall under, but I feel that in the end the costs balance themselves out.

"Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible."
— Frank Zappa

"Art -- the one achievement of Man which has made the long trip up from all fours seem well advised." - James Thurber

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

To clarify, here's my position:

1. Quote entire project, estimating all costs, profit, etc.
2. If the project goes out of scope, add those hours to the bill until complete, with client approval.

Hope this makes my point clearer. I don't simply bill by the hour till the job is done, it's a hybrid of the two.

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

3dogmama's picture
1990 pencils

Exactly. We're all saying the same thing, quoting on a per project base. However, when I inform a client that they've reached their limit with me, they in turn (as would I) want another estimate on how much it is going to cost to finish the project. I don't state an hourly rate, but again hazard a guess as to how long the further alterations are going to take me.

I've always found quoting the most difficult part of this profession, and highly doubt that I've ever hit exactly on the nose when it comes to estimating my time. Utopia, I'm afraid, will ever only be found between the pages of a book; that or at: http://games.swirve.com/UTOPIA/index.php

"Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible."
— Frank Zappa

"Art -- the one achievement of Man which has made the long trip up from all fours seem well advised." - James Thurber

natobasso's picture
3951 pencils

I give my hourly rate so the client knows exactly how much things are going to cost if I say "that'll be two hours".

I feel you can reach utopia with this because you're getting paid for your work, eliminating any guesswork along the way.

Otherwise, +1. :)

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

3dogmama's picture
1990 pencils

Now, for Suzanne's original question...

As with any design job, logo times vary. I did one with a quick sketch at an impromptu hotel lobby meeting once (boar genetics for some reason to me equalled testicles--the final was near to two joined circles; however, I never let them know how I arrived at that look!), while another one took weeks to arrive upon.
I find sitting down with the client and doing the double D while you meet (doodling and discussing) works best for me. It seems to save time in the long run. Unless there's a board to pass it by and that's a whole other enchilada altogether...

"Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible."
— Frank Zappa

"Art -- the one achievement of Man which has made the long trip up from all fours seem well advised." - James Thurber

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

Just wanted to let everybody know (those that care), that I am meeting this client today at noon to go over "his" ideas. God, I can only imagine what that will involve, however, I am remaining optimistic. Otherwise, I will just puke!!!!

I'll let you all know what happens. Thanks for caring!

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

It was the quickest meeting I have EVER had with a client, which is fine with me.

He handed me a rough sketch of what he was wanting. No problem. Whatever. Even though that's the whole reason why these people hire us to begin with, so WE can present THEM with sketches. But at this point, I don't care. I want this guy out of my hair as quickly as possible.

He wasn't pissed or anything like that, in fact, just the opposite. He even apologized for "appearing" to be in a hurry and didn't realize that what I was doing for him wasn't as long as he thought. He said that sometimes to him, it may feel like 7 or 8 days, when in reality, it's only 3. That's cool. Perhaps my e-mail to him (although professional) explained to him that what I'm doing here is not something that typically takes a day or two.

I even reiterated to him that wouldn't he rather this take a little longer so he gets the PERFECT logo which will last for years, than receiving something that's mediocre that will only last 6 months? (thanks Nato for that suggestion, BTW). Of course, he agreed.

I think he was just stressed because he recently ran out of business cards and was anxious to get new ones made with the new logo design. Fine. I can understand that.

So, hopefully after this, he and I will be on the same page and everything will be kosher. I told him that I will have these changes in less than a week, which I know I can do. I guess we'll see what happens after that.

Thanks for everybody's input. Every little thing helps. Love you guys!!!

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

Leaky Penny's picture
2612 pencils

"I want my company initials, OGC, simple and clean! Nothing more, nothing less!"

http://flickr.com/photos/bamaicculus/2438036806/

Leaky Penny
www.leakypenny.com

Believe it or not, I can actually draw. - Jean Michel Basquiat

Leaky Penny
Check out what I've been up to lately!
http://petersonjoseph.com

I'm going to print it out and eat it.

-Unknown Artist

designmonkey's picture
98 pencils

I hope this isnt too off the subject, as Im not going to read every post. However, isn't lack of organization of ideas part of the problem here.

Asking the client questions based on what he's looking for can cut down design time significantly. That way, you can probably avoid having to do a second or third round of concepts. I think 3dogmama brought this up.....but avoiding this step can potentially be disastrous for the project.

onegirlcreative's picture
1090 pencils

Having ALL of my clients fill out a design questionnaire for their logo goes without saying. Not only that, I sat with this guy for about two hours when we first met going over sketches and ideas together.

Sometimes, just because they have filled out a questionnaire and I have discussed options/ideas with them beforehand, does not guarantee a perfect, flawless experience. For the most part (as I stated from the very beginning), most of my clients are happy with the first round of samples that I give them. However, every now and then, there is a client who needs a little more hand-holding thereafter.

I have been doing this for over 5 years (although not as long as some, but not as little as many), so I do know the steps that should be taken to ensure the easiest process for both designer (myself) and the client and believe me, nothing would please me more than to hit the nail on the head the first time around.

Unfortunately, seeing as we don't live in a perfect world, that doesn't always happen.

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"I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy as long as I can paint." ~ Frida Kahlo

www.onegirlcreative.com

Creativebits is a blog about Creativity, Graphic Design, Adobe, Apple and other related subjects.

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