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Halo effect on images with clipping paths imported from Photoshop into Indesign

Carmitage's picture

I created clipping paths in photoshop around some shots of shoes to silhouette them for a catalog. The files were saved as tiffs per the client's request. When those shots are placed in InDesign on a solid color background, the clipping path somehow looks as if it has shifted, and you see some of the white background peeking through-kind of creating a "halo" effect. However, when you open the files in photoshop and check the path by doing the same thing...placing it in a new psd file with a solid background, there is no halo, and the image butts up cleanly to the path.

I've done some troubleshooting, like setting my view in InDesign at high resolution display, and the halo still shows up. I've check the flatness of the clipping path in photoshop and it's at a setting of 1, which should be perfect. I've even printed the images from a test InDesign file and no halo appears on the printout. Is this a problem with InDesign's screen view or might it be the psd file creating the problem? Any suggestions on how to remedy this issue would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks!

ireid's picture

If you've printed it

Then it should be fine. BUT is this going to be used for display only online or printed?

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

Carmitage's picture

Print or Web use?

Thanks! The job will be printed. The client is insisting that she's never had this problem before, but post production on images was done by someone else. Not sure what they did, and I've never encountered this problem either. Thank you for your help! :)

ireid's picture

you're welcome

But please note that SHOULD anything go wrong. Don't hold me responsible! lol

"Try not, Do! or do not, there is no try."
-Yoda

natobasso's picture

Image previews are lo res,

Image previews are lo res, about 8bits if I remember right. As long as it doesn't print you're fine, though I'd make sure you have your path set as 'clipping path' in ps and even try an eps rather than tif for the clipped image for comparison.

Make a pdf/x-1a. Does the artifact still show up?

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Powerpoint is not a design application

Carmitage's picture

Will give x-1a a try

Thank you for the suggestion. I'll give it a try and see what happens.
:)

Thanks!!

Awesome tips...

Regards,

SBL clipping path services

jHouse's picture

Uh - I wouldn't do Clipping

Uh - I wouldn't do Clipping Paths in PS personally.
Here's what I would do that might be worth a try?

Say you have a football you want to put in to Indy - I'd select the ball and remove the background of the image so it sits on transparency pattern - Edit > Trim > Transparent Pixels - then place in to Indy. Much less hassle I think.

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BRANDING | PRINT | WEB
www.jhousedesign.com
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"Did I really try to find an "undo" button on a vending machine?"

natobasso's picture

This has more steps and is

This has more steps and is destructive to the original image. A clipping path is adjustable and doesn't mess with the original image (if you keep it a psd or layered tif).

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

jHouse's picture

How is it destructible? A

How is it destructible? A mask in Photoshop?

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BRANDING | PRINT | WEB
www.jhousedesign.com
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"Did I really try to find an "undo" button on a vending machine?"

natobasso's picture

Removing the background is

Removing the background is what is known as "Destructive" editing. Making any alteration to the image, really, is also desctructive, by definition.

Why remove a part of the image when you can simply mask it or clip it out and get the same effect? Less effort and you can use that image for other things.

Sure, you can just copy that image for different uses, but there's something to be said for saving disk space, even in this day and age. :)

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Natobasso
dirtandrust.com
"Powerpoint is not a design application"

jHouse's picture

Sure - personally I prefer

Sure - personally I prefer to edit masks in PS and update link in Indy - but thats just how I work.

I know exactly what you mean by destructive editing.

I also didnt mean delete background - simply use a layer mask.

Cheers
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BRANDING | PRINT | WEB
www.jhousedesign.com
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"Did I really try to find an "undo" button on a vending machine?"

KellyR's picture

I use the layer mask option,

I use the layer mask option, as well. Just save as a PSD file and it should come out gorgeous.

Someone educate me - what's the deal with people still sticking with TIFF images, anyhow, when PSD images appear to accomplish the same trick (plus leave the file more versatile)?

I've been using PSD images placed into InDesign ad designs for quite some time and have never run into a problem using them, but I've had other people "tsk" me for it and tell me I should be using TIFFs.

jHouse's picture

Stuff 'em - I do the

Stuff 'em - I use PSD. I think its cos TIFF is not compressed and is supported by loads of old stuff. The people tutting - are they veterans?

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BRANDING | PRINT | WEB
www.jhousedesign.com
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"Did I really try to find an "undo" button on a vending machine?"

gwells's picture

um... TIFs can be

um... TIFs can be compressed. i compress any time i make a TIF.

and yes, i'm sure it's because lots of things support TIFs that don't support PSDs. and because people who don't have PS or CS can open a TIF file.

jHouse's picture

Sure - but I think you can

Sure - but I think you can set it to not compress - non-lossy right?

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BRANDING | PRINT | WEB
www.jhousedesign.com
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"Did I really try to find an "undo" button on a vending machine?"

gwells's picture

you can set it either way.

you can set it either way. and you can set compression to be either lossy or non-lossy. standard TIF compression is LZW, which is non-lossy.

KellyR's picture

I've actually found in some

I've actually found in some cases compressing the TIFF files creates issues. But I really think that all depends upon the printers you go with.

I see now the reason for using TIFF files - they're more versatile if you're having to ship your designs to other places...

In my own work environment, though, we print our own ads, and every workstation here has all the Creative Suite apps, so there's really no reason for us - in our situation - to have to use TIFFs.

Thanks for the explanation. :)

gwells's picture

i've never had a problem

i've never had a problem sending a compressed TIF out to a printer. if i did, i'd probably look for a new printer. ;)

you're right, though. if you have no need for them in your workflow, there's no need to save as TIF, just work with the PSD.

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